Loading

Please wait...

Delestrogen

Generic Name: estradiol (injection) (ESS tra DYE ol)
Brand Name: Delestrogen, Depo-Estradiol
Physician reviewed Delestrogen (injection) (injection) patient information - includes Delestrogen (injection) description, dosage and directions.

Average Savings for estradiol valerate (generic): 25.73%
  • Prescription Settings
  • X

Prices and coupons of Delestrogen

Set your location
for drug prices near you

Enter your zip code


Please wait while the prices are loaded...

Don’t see your pharmacy listed? Most pharmacies accept our discounts, so have your pharmacist enter this coupon to see if you will save money:

Drug Information:
Delestrogen is a form of estrogen, a female sex hormone that regulates many processes in the body. Delestrogen is used to treat certain symptoms of menopause such as hot flashes and vaginal dryness, burning, or irritation. It is also used to treat a lack of estrogen that is caused by ovarian failure or a condition called hypogonadism. Some forms of Estradiol injection are used in men to treat the symptoms of prostate cancer. Delestrogen treats only the symptoms of prostate cancer but does not treat the cancer itself. Learn more

Delestrogen Side Effects

Delestrogen Side Effects

Note: This document contains side effect information about estradiol. Some of the dosage forms listed on this page may not apply to the brand name Delestrogen.

For the Consumer

Applies to estradiol: vaginal capsule liquid filled, vaginal cream, vaginal insert extended release, vaginal tablet

Other dosage forms:

  • transdermal gel/jelly, transdermal patch extended release, transdermal spray

Warning

Vaginal route (Insert, Extended Release; Cream)

Estrogens increase the risk of endometrial cancer; monitor for abnormal vaginal bleeding. Estrogens with or without progestins should not be used for the prevention of cardiovascular disease or dementia. Increased risks of myocardial infarction, stroke, invasive breast cancer, pulmonary emboli, and deep vein thrombosis in postmenopausal women (50 to 79 years of age) have been reported. An increased risk of developing probable dementia in postmenopausal women 65 years of age or older has also been reported in women receiving estrogen alone or estrogen combined with progestins. Risks should be assumed to be similar for other doses, combinations, and dosage forms of estrogens and progestins. Estrogens, with or without progestins, should be prescribed at the lowest effective doses and for the shortest duration possible.

Vaginal route (Insert, Extended Release)

Use of unopposed estrogens increases the risk of endometrial cancer, while addition of a progestin decreases the risk of endometrial hyperplasia. Rule out malignancy if abnormal vaginal bleeding develops. Do not use estrogen alone or in combination with progestin to prevent cardiovascular disease or dementia. There is an increased risk of cardiovascular disorders (ie, DVT, pulmonary embolism, stroke, myocardial infarction) with combination therapy in women 50 years or older, and an increased risk of dementia in women 65 years or older with estrogen monotherapy or combination therapy. Combination therapy also increases the risk of invasive breast cancer. Prescribe estrogens with or without progestins at the lowest effective dose and for the shortest duration consistent with risks and treatment goals.

Along with its needed effects, estradiol (the active ingredient contained in Delestrogen) may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking estradiol:

Less common

  • Vaginal yeast infection

Incidence not known

  • Change in vaginal discharge
  • clear or bloody discharge from the nipple
  • decrease in the amount of urine
  • dimpling of the breast skin
  • fast heartbeat
  • fever
  • hives, itching, or rash
  • hoarseness
  • inverted nipple
  • irritation
  • joint pain, stiffness, or swelling
  • lump in the breast or under the arm
  • noisy, rattling breathing
  • pain or feeling of pressure in the pelvis
  • pain, redness, or swelling in the arm or leg
  • persistent crusting or scaling of the nipple
  • redness of the skin
  • redness or swelling of the breast
  • sore on the skin of the breast that does not heal
  • swelling of the eyelids, face, fingers, lips, hands, feet, or lower legs
  • tightness in the chest
  • troubled breathing at rest
  • troubled breathing or swallowing
  • vaginal bleeding

Get emergency help immediately if any of the following symptoms of overdose occur while taking estradiol:

Symptoms of overdose

  • Dizziness
  • drowsiness
  • nausea
  • stomach pain
  • tenderness of the breasts
  • unusual tiredness or weakness
  • vomiting

Some side effects of estradiol may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common

  • Back pain
  • headache
  • itching or pain of the vagina or genital area
  • thick, white vaginal discharge with mild or no odor
  • weight gain

Less common

  • Body aches or pain
  • chills
  • cough
  • diarrhea
  • ear congestion
  • loss of voice
  • nasal congestion
  • runny nose
  • sneezing
  • sore throat

Incidence not known

  • Feeling sad or empty
  • headache, severe and throbbing
  • irritability
  • lack of appetite
  • tiredness
  • trouble concentrating
  • trouble sleeping
  • welts

For Healthcare Professionals

Applies to estradiol: compounding powder, intramuscular solution, oral tablet, transdermal emulsion, transdermal film extended release, transdermal gel, transdermal spray, vaginal ring

Genitourinary

Very common (10% or more): Breast pain (29%)

Common (1% to 10%): Vulvovaginal pruritus, leukorrhea, vaginal hemorrhage, vaginal discharge, vaginal discomfort, menopause symptoms, breakthrough bleeding or spotting, dysmenorrhea, breast swelling, menorrhagia, metrorrhagia, endometrial hyperplasia

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Urinary problems

Rare (less than 0.1%): Galactorrhea

Postmarketing reports: Vaginal irritation, vaginal pain, genital pruritus, changes in bleeding pattern, pelvic pain, breast tenderness, vaginal ulceration, uterine fibroids

Gastrointestinal

Very common (10% or more): Abdominal pain (16%),

Common (1% to 10%): Flatulence, nausea, diarrhea

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Vomiting

Postmarketing reports: Abdominal distension

Musculoskeletal

Very common (10% or more): Back pain (11%), arthralgia (11%)

Common (1% to 10%): Leg cramps

Cardiovascular

Common (1% to 10%): Varicose veins, cardiac symptoms (e.g. palpitations)

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Hot flush, hypertension, venous thromboembolic disease

Rare (less than 0.1%): Arterial hypertension

Postmarketing reports: Deep vein thrombosis, changes in blood pressure

Nervous system

Very common (10% or more): Headache (18%)

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Vertigo, migraine

Rare (less than 0.1%): Aggravation of epilepsy

Postmarketing reports: Migraine aggravated, paresthesia, dizziness

Oncologic

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Benign breast neoplasm, increased volume of uterine leiomyoma

Postmarketing reports: Endometrial cancer, breast cancer

Other

Very common (10% or more): Pain (11%)

Common (1% to 10%): Edema

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Weight increased, asthenia

Postmarketing reports: Drug ineffectiveness, blood estrogen increase, fatigue, exacerbation of hereditary angioedema

Psychiatric

Common (1% to 10%): Depression

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Sleep disorders, nervousness, mood swings

Rare (less than 0.1%): Change in libido

Postmarketing reports: Vaginismus, insomnia, anxiety, irritability

Dermatologic

Common (1% to 10%): Pruritus

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Rash

Rare (less than 0.1%): Skin discoloration, acne

Postmarketing reports: Urticaria, erythematous or pruritic rash, alopecia, hyperhidrosis, night sweats, contact dermatitis, eczema

Ocular

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Vision abnormal NOS

Postmarketing reports: Visual disturbances, contact lens intolerance

Hepatic

Rare (less than 0.1%): Liver function tests abnormalities

Postmarketing reports: Cholestatic jaundice

Metabolic

Rare (less than 0.1%): Glucose intolerance

Postmarketing reports: Fluid retention

Hypersensitivity

Rare (less than 0.1%): Anaphylactic reaction (with a past history of allergic reaction)

Postmarketing reports: Anaphylactic reactions, hypersensitivity

Immunologic

Very common (10% or more): Upper respiratory tract infection (17%)

Common (1% to 10%): Vulvovaginal mycotic infection, pharyngitis, rhinitis, sinusitis, moniliasis genital

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Vaginitis/vaginal candidosis

Local

Common (1% to 10%): Skin irritation (topical gel)

Postmarketing reports: Application site reaction

Editorial References and Review

Medically reviewed by USARx EDITORIAL TEAM Last updated on 1/1/2020.

Source: Drugs.com Delestrogen (www.drugs.com/mtm/delestrogen-injection.html).