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Clindamycin

Generic Name: clindamycin (oral/injection) (klin da MYE sin)
Brand Names: Cleocin HCl, Cleocin Pediatric, Cleocin Phosphate, Cleocin Phosphate ADD-Vantage, Clindesse, ClindaMax Vaginal
Clindamycin (Cleocin) is used to treat serious infections caused by bacteria. Includes clindamycin side effects, interactions and indications.
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Clindamycin Coupons & Prices

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Drug Information:
Clindamycin is an antibiotic that fights bacteria in the body. Clindamycin is used to treat serious infections caused by bacteria. Clindamycin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Clindamycin can cause diarrhea, which may be severe or lead to serious, life-threatening intestinal problems. If you have diarrhea that is watery or bloody, stop using this medicine and call your doctor. Before using clindamycin, tell your doctor if you have kidney disease, liver disease, an intestinal disorder such as colitis or Crohn's disease, or a history of asthma, eczema, or allergic skin Reaction. Learn more

Pickup / Home Delivery

USARx offers multiple ways to purchase this medication. Choose the Best option for you!

  • Guaranteed Price
    Local Pharmacy Pickup

    Pay this amount and pick up your prescription at ANY Retail pharmacy of your choice! Walgreens, CVS, Walmart, etc.

  • 30-day supply
    90-day supply
    Mail Order Home Delivery

    The easiest way to receive your medications.

Clindamycin Medicare Coverage

Overview

Does Medicare cover Clindamycin?

Yes

99% of Medicare Part D and Medicare Advantage plans cover this drug.
How much is my Clindamycin co-pay with Medicare?

It depends. Which coverage stage are you in? Click on a tab below…

CO-PAY RANGE

$2 – $20

In the Deductible co-pay stage, you are responsible for the full cost of your prescriptions. Your Medicare deductible cannot exceed $360 in 2016.

Ways to Save on Clindamycin

Here are some ways that may lower the cost of your clindamycin prescription.

  • Instead of Medicare, Use a USA Rx Coupon

    If your Medicare co-pay is higher, you can save money by using a USARx coupon instead.

Clindamycin Side Effects

For the Consumer

Applies to clindamycin: oral capsule, oral powder for solution

Other dosage forms:

  • solution

Warning

Oral route (Powder for Solution)

Pseudomembranous colitis has been reported with nearly all antibacterial agents, including clindamycin, and may range in severity from mild to life-threatening. Therefore, it is important to consider this diagnosis in patients who present with diarrhea subsequent to the administration of antibacterial agents. Because clindamycin therapy has been associated with severe colitis which may end fatally, it should be reserved for serious infections where less toxic antimicrobial agents are inappropriate. Diarrhea, colitis, and pseudomembranous colitis have been observed to begin up to several weeks following cessation of therapy with clindamycin.

Oral route (Capsule)

Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea (CDAD) has been reported with nearly all antibacterial agents, including clindamycin, and may range in severity from mild diarrhea to life-threatening colitis and has been observed to begin over 2 months after the administration of antibacterial agents. It is important to consider this diagnosis in patients who present with diarrhea subsequent to the administration of antibacterial agents. If CDAD is confirmed or suspected, antibiotic therapy not directed against Clostridium difficile may need to be discontinued. Because clindamycin therapy has been associated with severe colitis which may end fatally, it should be reserved for serious infections where less toxic antimicrobial agents are inappropriate.

Along with its needed effects, clindamycin may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking clindamycin:

Rare

  • Cracks in the skin
  • loss of heat from the body
  • red, swollen skin scaly skin

Incidence not known

  • Abdominal or stomach cramps, pain, or tenderness
  • black, tarry stools
  • bleeding gums
  • blistering, peeling, or loosening of the skin
  • bloating
  • blood in the urine or stools
  • blurred vision
  • chest pain
  • chills
  • clay-colored stools
  • cloudy urine
  • confusion
  • cough or hoarseness
  • dark urine
  • decrease in the amount of urine
  • diarrhea
  • diarrhea, watery and severe, which may also be bloody
  • difficulty with swallowing
  • dizziness
  • dizziness, faintness, or lightheadedness when getting up suddenly from a lying or sitting position
  • dry mouth
  • fast heartbeat
  • fever with or without chills
  • general feeling of tiredness or weakness
  • headache
  • heartburn
  • heart stops
  • hives or welts, itching, or skin rash
  • increased thirst
  • itching of the vagina or genital area
  • joint or muscle pain
  • loss of appetite
  • lower back or side pain
  • nausea or vomiting
  • no breathing
  • no pulse or blood pressure
  • pain during sexual intercourse
  • pain in the lower back or side
  • painful or difficult urination
  • pinpoint red spots on the skin
  • puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips, or tongue
  • rash with flat lesions or small raised lesions on the skin
  • red skin lesions, often with a purple center
  • red, irritated eyes
  • redness of the skin
  • sore throat
  • sores, ulcers, or white spots in the mouth or on the lips
  • swollen glands
  • thick, white vaginal discharge with no odor or with a mild odor
  • thirst
  • tightness in the chest
  • trouble breathing
  • unconscious
  • unpleasant breath odor
  • unusual bleeding or bruising
  • unusual tiredness or weakness
  • unusual weight loss
  • vomiting of blood
  • yellow eyes or skin

For Healthcare Professionals

Applies to clindamycin: compounding powder, injectable solution, intravenous solution, oral capsule, oral powder for reconstitution

Gastrointestinal

The onset of pseudomembranous colitis symptoms may occur during or after antibacterial treatment and is associated with the presence of Clostridium difficile toxin in the stool. Pseudomembranous colitis may also be associated with toxic megacolon, which can be life-threatening.

An unpleasant or metallic taste has occasionally been reported after high doses of IV clindamycin.

Common (1% to 10%): Pseudomembranous colitis, diarrhea, abdominal pain

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Dysgeusia, nausea, vomiting

Frequency not reported: Esophageal ulcers, esophagitis (oral preparations)

Dermatologic

Common (1% to 10%): Maculopapular rash

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Urticaria

Rare (less than 0.1%): Erythema multiforme, pruritus

Frequency not reported: Toxic epidermal necrolysis, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, exfoliative dermatitis, bullous dermatitis, generalized mild to moderate morbilliform-like rash, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP), Sweet's Syndrome

Postmarketing reports: Serious cutaneous adverse reaction

Rash was particularly common in AIDS patients.

A 47-year-old female patient with multiple comorbidities was diagnosed with Sweet's Syndrome. The patient's symptoms developed 2 days after initiating oral clindamycin therapy for a tooth infection. The patient's symptoms persisted despite tooth extraction and continuance of antibiotic treatment with intravenous, then oral, clindamycin. Following discontinuation of clindamycin, the patient's symptoms resolved over several days. Drug-induced Sweet's syndrome was determined based on the temporal relationship of the patient's symptoms, the beginning and end of clindamycin therapy, and the exclusion of other etiologies.

Three days after starting oral clindamycin for the persistence of symptoms following a root canal, a 34-year-old male patient reported "pimples" on his scalp which changed to pustules 24 hours later. The lesions progressed and the patient's antibiotic therapy was discontinued. Two days later, the rash improved considerably. The patient met the diagnostic criteria for drug-induced Sweet's syndrome and clindamycin was the most likely cause due to the timeline of antibiotic therapy and the patient's improvement following its discontinuation.

Hypersensitivity

Frequency not reported: Anaphylactoid reactions, drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic systems (DRESS)

Cardiovascular

Cardiorespiratory arrest and hypotension have been reported after too rapid IV administration. Thrombophlebitis has been reported after intravenous infusion.

Common (1% to 10%): Thrombophlebitis (after IV infusion)

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Cardiorespiratory arrest, hypotension

Genitourinary

Frequency not reported: Vaginitis

Hematologic

Neutropenia (ANC 945 cells/mm3) occurred in a 68-year-old male 6 days after receiving a single 600 mg oral dose of clindamycin. The neutrophil count normalized after 2 weeks.

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Eosinophilia

Frequency not reported: Neutropenia, leucopenia, agranulocytosis, thrombocytopenia

Hepatic

Common (1% to 10%): Liver function test abnormalities

Frequency not reported: Jaundice

Local

Pain, induration, and sterile abscess have been reported after intramuscular administration.

Frequency not reported: Injection site irritation, pain, abscess formation

Musculoskeletal

Frequency not reported: Polyarthritis

Renal

Frequency not reported: Renal dysfunction, as shown by azotemia, oliguria, and/or proteinuria

Editorial References and Review

Medically reviewed by USARx EDITORIAL TEAM Last updated on 1/1/2020.

Source: Drugs.com Clindamycin (www.drugs.com/clindamycin.html).