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Fact Checked

Double-Check The URL Before You Sign Up!

It’s signup season again for new health plans, and that means it’s time again for health care scammers to try and fool you into buying misleading or outright fake plans that lure you in with a low premium but then deliver even less than what you pay for. Although the state and federal government health care exchanges are careful about which plans they certify and approve, con artists will still find ways to fool the unwary.

Trick 1: A Near-Miss URL

While the government may keep tabs on its own websites, it can’t do the same for every site on the internet. For every secure, official website there are a dozen more whose names are based on incorrect spellings, synonyms, and similar concepts whose only purpose is to convince you to download malware in exchange for your personal information. The only difference with fake health care exchanges is that they’re either selling you fake insurance, inadequate insurance, or a discount card dressed up like insurance.

Trick 2: The Fastball Special

Cons of all kinds usually operate on a limited time frame, since if their marks have the opportunity to think carefully about the offer it raises the chance that they’ll figure out what they’re really looking at. The registration window is somewhat unfortunate because it provides scammers with a built-in ticking clock, but even so the window is wide enough that fake policies will often advertise “limited-time offers” that threaten to end within a few days or less.

Trick 3: Obfuscating Small Print

If it’s good enough for banks and credit card companies, then it’s good enough for insurance “supplements” which will charge you a modest fee in exchange for barely enough benefits to qualify as legal. It’s tricky to write a plan description which implies everything but promises nothing, but those who can pull it off just right can sucker in a lot of unfortunate customers who can’t do much legally once they find out the truth. Fortunately, not every discount service bills itself as a health care substitute so it can take your personal information or your money. The USA Rx pharmacy discount card doesn’t claim to be insurance and it doesn’t claim to supplement your insurance beyond the obvious: by giving you a discount on all kinds of prescription medication in over 60,000 pharmacies nationwide. We don’t want your money and we don’t want your personal information aside from your name and an email address so we can send you a copy of your free pharmacy discount card. And if you’d like to learn more, you’re welcome to call our toll-free number at 888-277-3911 or send us an email at [email protected].

Published November 17th, 2015 by USA Rx
Fact Checked by Chris Riley

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