Fact Checked

Disposing Of Drugs (Since The Drain Won’t Do)

Disposing Of Drugs (Since The Drain Won’t Do)It happens often enough: your doctor prescribes you a few high-strength painkillers after a surgery, but your lingering pains disappear before you’ve emptied half the bottle, or else they fade to the point where you can get by with over-the-counter aspirin or Tylenol. Perhaps your pharmacist packed a few extra pills into your antibacterial regimen as a “just in case,” or perhaps the drugs you’re taking for a mental issue aren’t working for you and so there’s no point in finishing off the whole bottle.

However it happens, it’s not uncommon to wind up with more pills than you need, and at that point you end up with a question: what are you supposed to do with them?  

 

 

 

Disposal Troubles

The reason why a lot of drugs are prescription only is because of one simple reason: they’re too dangerous to take without a doctor’s approval. Some drugs, such as morphine and oxycodone, can be addictive, while others can have dangerous side effects or cause unexpected reactions in patients without the condition they’re meant to treat. For instance, the drug Ritalin can calm down children who suffer from ADD or ADHD, but because Ritalin is a stimulant it can cause hyperactivity in someone without one of these disorders.

Prescription drug abuse is, if anything, just as bad as illegal drug abuse, mostly thanks to the fact that prescription drugs are so much easier to come by. Because these drugs are dangerous and because they’re subject to abuse, it’s important to the community as well as to your medicine cabinet that you dispose of your excess drugs properly.

Unfortunately, the two easiest methods are both bad ideas. If you throw your pills into the garbage, there’s a risk that someone at some point will discover your treasure trove. On the other hand, if you throw them in the sink or flush them down the toilet, you’re introducing some fairly strong pharmaceutical compounds into the groundwater. Waste-treatment plants are designed to filter out plenty of waste materials and kill dangerous bacteria, but they aren’t very good at removing the dozens or possibly hundreds of medical compounds out there.  

 

A Better Way

Luckily, more and more communities around the country are providing drug take-back boxes in police stations and pharmacies. These boxes don’t keep track of who uses them or how often – their only concern is getting excess prescription drugs out of the hands of the general public, and as such there’s no need to worry about having to share your medical problems with anybody.

However, one thing the take-back boxes don’t do is provide a refund for drugs not used. Instead, if you’re looking to save some money on medication, you should try signing up for a free USA Rx pharmacy discount card. The process is simple, quick, and easy, and best of all you only need to give us your name and an email address in order to get your card. The USA Rx discount is in many cases comparable to the amount you’d pay through your insurance, plus our discount has the added benefit of never running out. If you wish to know more, consider contacting us at 888-277-3911 or send us an email at [email protected].

Published August 20th, 2015 by Stephanie Clegg
Fact Checked by Chris Riley

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